3 Ways to Get Rid of Clogged Pores Fast

No one likes clogged pores.  They are the result of oil, dead skin cells, dirt, and debris blocking your pores.  If left untreated they can lead to acne, whiteheads, and blackheads.  It’s important to clean them often.  Today, we’ll show you three ways to unclog your pores fast.

1. Unclog with Steam

history-steam-ancient-roman-baths_250x167Steam bathing has been used all around the world since ancient times. The ancient Greeks and Romans used steam bathing for anything from drawing toxins out of the body to stimulating circulation.  The Japanese use mineral-rich hot springs, called “onsen”, for everything from healing wounds to washing away the sins of the mortal world.

To clean your pores with steam, start by removing any makeup and applying a gentle cleanser.  You want to be sure to remove makeup and dirt before steaming.  Rinse the cleanser off with cold water.  Pat, don’t rub, your skin dry.

Put a pot of water on the stove with medium-high heat.  As soon as the water starts to steam, it’s ready.  Don’t let it boil.  Either transfer the water to a large bowl, or just use the pot itself.  At this point you may want to add two to three bags (or two to three teaspoons if loose) of green tea, or chamomile tea, to give your steam a little boost.

08-face-steaming-lgnGreen tea is rich in vitamins C and E.  They are powerful antioxidants which help to reduce the visible appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, as well as reduce under-eye swelling and discoloration.  Chamomile is well known for reducing inflammation and soothing irritated skin.  Topical chamomile has been shown to reduce skin lesions, pain, and inflammation better than hydrocortisone.[1] Inhalation of chamomile vapors has been shown reduce anxiety and general depression, is widely used in cosmetic products to soothe and soften the skin, and is moderately effective in the treatment of eczema.[2]  To superpower your steam with these amazing benefits, just put the tea into the water, cover with a towel, and let it steep for five minutes.

Whether you add tea to your steam, or not, once you are ready for your steam treatment put a towel over your head and lean over the steaming water.  Be sure to tent the towel over the bowl, and let your skin absorb the pore loosening steam for five to ten minutes.  Do not over-steam.

The steam will help loosing dirt and oil that is locked into your pores.  It is important that you use cold water to wash away the particles that emerged and use moisturizer to prevent your skin from drying out.

2. Exfoliate with a Dry Brush

sublime-beauty-face-brush-woman-brushing-faceDry brushing has been used for centuries by Scandinavians and Russians to exfoliate and stimulate the skin.  Exfoliation dates back even further to ancient Egyptians, who used various materials to peel, exfoliate, and rejuvenate the skin.

To clean your skin with dry brushing, start by removing any makeup and applying a gentle cleanser.  You want to be sure to remove makeup and dirt before steaming.  Rinse the cleanser off with cold water.  Pat, don’t rub, your skin dry.  This methods won’t work if your skin is damp.

To dry brush, make sure you are using a brush specifically designed for the face with soft bristles made from natural fibers.  Body brushes are much to harsh on delicate facial skin.

Gently brush your skin in small circular movements.  Concentrate on the areas that are driest.  Be careful with the skin around your eyes as it is very delicate.  When finished, rinse your face with cool water and apply moisturizer to prevent dryness.

3. Use a Face Mask

face-mask-for-whiteheadsFace masks were the first cosmetic product used in the world of beauty.  With roots in ancient Asia and Egypt, fruit, clay and mud have all been used.  Dead Sea Clay is the most famous example, and has been shown to be antimicrobial[3], an effective treatment for psoriasis, eczema[4], rheumatoid arthritis[5], and more.

To unclog pores with a face mask, start by removing any makeup and applying a gentle cleanser.  You want to be sure to remove makeup and dirt before steaming.  Rinse the cleanser off with cold water.  Pat, don’t rub, your skin dry.

You can use a prepared mask, or a dry mask that you can mix at home.  The benefits of a dry mask is that you can superpower your mask by mixing it with things like yoghurt or honey.   Mixing clay with yogurt turns your mask into an anti-aging powerhouse.  That’s because yogurt is full of lactic acid, which helps to dissolve dead skin cells, tighten skin, and reduce discoloration.  Mixing your clay with honey makes it an acne-fighting superhero.  This is because it is antibacterial, loaded with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and natural enzymes.  Kaiya Naturals has three different dry masks that are perfect for this.  

Prepare the mask by mixing a teaspoon of the clay mixture with half a teaspoon of water, yoghurt, or honey in a separate bowl.  Mix together with your finger, or a wooden spoon.  (Make sure that the bowl is not made of metal and don’t use any metal utensils to mix the mask!  Clay absorbs heavy metals like mercury, cadmium, lead and benzene.  This is great if it is pulling those metals out of your face.  It’s not so great if it is pulling those metals out of your bowl, or spoon, and depositing them onto your face.)

Whether you have a prepared mask, or you mix it yourself, apply the mask to your face avoiding the area around your eyes.  Wait until the mask is dry.  This usually takes 15-20min.  Wipe off with warm water.  Apply a moisturizer to prevent skin from drying.


If there is anything that you would like me to talk about feel free to reach out to me either here, via email: kedric@kaiya-naturals.com, on twitter @kaiyanaturals, or on Facebook @kaiyanaturals.  Also  please, please, please share or comment on this article.  Seriously, I’d love to hear your feedback in the comment section below.

Stay Natural,

Kedric

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.  For educational purposes only.


References:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21617262

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2995283/

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16700781

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24163956

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2397624

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