How Marijuana Could Save Your Skin

It’s controversial.  From illicit drug to medical breakthrough and legal recreational substance, marijuana is anything but simple.  Modern science has spent a good deal of time studying it recently, and a lot more needs to be done.  However, what we know so far, is that marijuana could save your skin.

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Allergi…what?  Allergic Contact Dermatitis is a form rash caused by an allergic reaction to a material, called an allergen, in contact with the skin.  It  is also called a contact allergy.  Examples would be contact with Poison Ivy, or if you’re allergic to nickel and get rashes from earrings, watches, or metal buttons that contain it.  There are many forms of it.  It turns our that in a 2007 study, when THC, the psychoactive component of marijuana, was topically applied to such a rash it decreased the allergic reaction.[1]  So, the next time you’re out in the woods, be sure to have some marijuana extract in your first aid kit.

Acne

Acne is the most common skin disease in western civilization.  It affects nearly 80% of the population at some time or another.[2]  Depending on the severity of acne it is typically treated with anything from topical chemicals, like benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid, to internal chemicals, like antibiotics, birth control pills, or isotretinoin.  When acne does not respond to medicine there are multiple procedures available, like laser and light therapy, chemical peels, and surgical removal.[3]

cannabis-oil-acneResearch is showing that marijuana helps to control acne in two ways.  First, CBD, a non-psychoactive compound found in hemp and marijuana, has been shown to reduce oil production by causing the cells that make up the oil producing glands which clogs pores to die off at a faster rate.  Secondly, marijuana contains substances called terpenes.  Specific terpenes – limonene, linalool, and pinene – have been shown to inhibit the bacteria that causes acne (P. acnes).  One terpene, limonene, inhibits P. acnes bacteria better than the synthetic antibacterial chemical triclosan.[4]

Eczema

Eczema accounts for one-third of all dermatology cases.  It is a condition in which the skin’s immune-response system goes awry as a result of a complex interplay between both internal and external factors that usually result in itching, redness, swelling, and scaling.[5]

hemp-leaf-no-background-2-5-17Over 30 million Americans have some sort of eczema, and it is most common in babies and children.  It tends to go away as a child grows older, but some children will experience eczema into adulthood.  Adults can develop it, also, even if they never had it as a child.  Eczema is typically treated with topical steroids, oral anti-histamines, and moisturizers.[6]

The “Endocannabinoid System” is found in throughout our body[7].  Our skin is one of those places that has endocannabinoid receptors (CBD1 and CBD2).  When it comes to eczema, the CBD1 and CBD2 receptors inhibit the immune response characteristic of eczema.[8]

The Take Away

Marijuana has long been considered an illicit drug with no medical use.  However, modern science has disproved that notion.  While more research needs to be done, marijuana extract can be a useful tool in both your first aid kit, and on your bathroom counter.

If there is anything that you would like me to talk about feel free to reach out to me either here, via email: kedric@kaiya-naturals.com, on twitter @kaiyanaturals, or on Facebook @kaiyanaturals.  Also  please, please, please share or comment on this article.  Seriously, I’d love to hear your feedback in the comment section below.

Stay Natural,

Kedric

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.  For educational purposes only.


References:

[1] https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070816094649.htm 

[2] niams.nih.gov/…alth_info/acne/acne_ff.asp

[3]  https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne#treatment

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3165946/

[5] http://www.derm-hokudai.jp/shimizu-dermatology/pdf/07-01.pdf

[6] https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/

[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2241751/

[8] http://www.jimmunol.org/content/190/10/4929.long

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