3 New Years Resolutions Proven to Make You Look Younger

Did you know that there are three lifestyle choices that have been scientifically proven to have a greater impact on visible signs of aging than your genetics?  Wrinkles, dark spots, and sagging skin were once thought to be solely under the control of our genes.  It turns out that our DNA takes a back seat to the three “S Resolutions”.

Identical Twins

In the year 1999, Dr. Derrick Antell came out with a ground breaking study on how environment and lifestyle choices influence the aging process.[1]  Using identical twins, he discovered that those showing the greatest discrepancies in visible aging signs also had the greatest degree of discordance between personal lifestyle choices and habits.  The past seventeen years of research has supported his findings.[2][3][4][5][6][7]  So, what are these S Resolutions, you ask?

Sun

Excessive sun exposure is the number one cause of worsening one’s visible signs of aging.  It has been shown to destroy elastin and collagen in the skin, giving the appearance of wrinkles and sagging.[3]  It also causes melanin to mutate, resulting in dark spots and uneven pigmentation.[5]  One study even went so far as to say that sun exposure was responsible for 80% of the visible signs of aging.[6] Making a choice to avoid excessive exposure, and use daily sunscreen, can take years off of your appearance.

Smoking

Smoking 20 cigarettes a day has been scientifically proven to make you look 10 years older than you really are.[4]  Some studies have even found it to be an even more important factor in worsening the visible signs of aging than sun exposure.  Smoking reduces the blood supply to the skin and prevents it from getting the proper nutrients.  Making a choice to give up smoking cigarettes can take, on average, 5-7 years  off of you.  If you ever needed a reason to quit, you know besides cancer, this would definitely be one of them.  So, do your skin a favor this New Years and give up the habit.

Stress

Like smoking, stress reduces the blood supply to the skin causing you to look older.  Not only can stress make you look older, it can also make you physically age faster.[7]  Making a choice to reduce your stress levels will make you look younger, and be biologically younger.

The Take Away

Science tells us that you really can take ten years off of yourself by adopting the three S Resolutions: limiting your sun exposure, not smoking cigarettes, and reducing your stress.  Happy New Years from all of us here at Kaiya Naturals.  We hope that 2017 is your best year yet.

If there is anything that you would like me to talk about feel free to reach out to me either here, via email: kedric@kaiya-naturals.com, on twitter @kaiyanaturals, or on Facebook @kaiyanaturals.  Also  please, please, please share or comment on this article.  Seriously, I’d love to hear your feedback in the comment section below.

Stay Natural,

Kedric

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.  For educational purposes only.


References:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10597816

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12452869

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12366692

[4] http://www.stress.org/seniors/

[5] http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/dr-manish-khanna/dermatology-aging-skin_b_2697274.html

[6] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24101874

[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3370421/

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How to Build your Basic Personal Skin Care Routine

the-ten-questions-before-you-buy-your-cosmeticsIt’s a confusing mess out there.  There are hundreds of skin care products, and each has a specific purpose for every condition under the sun.  It seems like every month there is a new product that does something better than every other product can do that has ever existed…ever.  While advances in skin care technology is great, there are some basics that you just can’t rid of.  No matter how advanced we get, you’re always going to have to wash your face, right?  We get so caught up in the new, cool stuff that we forget the ABC’s of good skin care.  So, what are the basics?   Read on to find out.

Step Zero: Know Your Skin

Before we can talk about building your basic personal skin care routine, you need to figure out what kind of skin you have.  There are five different types of skin.  There is normal, combination, oily, dry, and sensitive.  Creating your routine starts with knowing which one you have.

Normal Skin

Your skin is so amazing that it causes others to weep upon the mere sight of your glowing, radiant skin.  No matter what you do, your skin is just perfect.   It’s never too oily, never too dry, and never irritated.  Yeah, the rest of us secretly hate you.

Oily Skin

Oily skin is most common in teens and young adults.  It can continue into middle-age, but usually in the form of combination skin.  It can also reappear around menopause, which causes a hormonal imbalance much like puberty.  You can test whether your skin is oily by taking a tissue and pressing it against your forehead.  If it sticks, then you’ve most likely got oily skin.  You also probably have problems with acne.

Combination Skin

This is the most common skin type.  Most mid-age adults have combination skin, though it is possible to have at any age.  This is when you have both oily, and dry skin.  Your T-Zone (forehead, nose, and possibly chin) is oily, while your U-Zone (cheeks and possibly chin) is dry.

Dry Skin

As we age, our skin matures from oily to dry.  Most mature adults have dry skin.  However, there are other factors that can give you dry skin at any age; things like like cold, dry weather, as well as the frequent use of soaps/detergents. If your skin is dry, then it most likely cracks and flakes.

Sensitive Skin

Sensitive skin is usually the result of an allergy.  It seems like anything that you put on your skin irritates it.  If your skin is constantly red, and itching, when you put products on it, then it is most likely sensitive.  You probably also have one of the other skin types, since sensitive skin is more of an allergy than a skin type.

Step 1: Cleanse

Now that you know what type of skin you have, the first step in your basic routine is to cleanse your skin.  No matter what your skin type is, it is important to cleanse your skin only once a day,  not use harsh soaps, and pat (not rub) your skin dry.   However, there are some differences.

Normal Skin

Just do anything you want with your perfect skin.

Oily Skin

Either use an oil-free soap, or a soap that contains oils high in linoleic acid (like Kaiya Naturals Higher Power Face Wash).

After patting your skin dry, use a toner to help unclog pores.  We make three different toners for this purpose, and you can find them here.

Once a week, after cleansing, use a mud mask with bentonite clay to help unclog pores.  You can find one here.

Combination Skin

Treat your T-Zone as would oily skin.  Either use an oil-free soap, or a soap that contains oils high in linoleic acid.  Afterwards, use a toner on your T-Zone to help unclog pores.  Once a week use a mud mask with bentonite clay on your T-Zone to further help unclog pores.

Treat your U-Zone as you would dry skin.  Wash with a gentle soap that doesn’t contain any alcohol, and rinse with water as cold as you can handle. Exfoliate your U-Zone once a week with a salt scrub to remove flaky skin cells.

Dry Skin

Use a gentle soap that doesn’t contain any alcohol.  Alcohol can further dry out your skin.  Rinse with water as cold as you can handle.  Hot water can strip your skin of essential oils and also dry it our even more.  Exfoliate your skin once a week with a salt scrub to remove flaky skin cells.

Sensitive Skin

Use a gentle soap with no alcohol, acids, or fragrance.  Look for soaps that contain calming ingredients like aloe or chamomile.  Also, the less ingredients the better, because there is less that could possibly irritate your skin.

Step 2: Moisturize

No matter what skin type you have, you should moisturize after cleansing, toning, exfoliating, or using a mask on your skin.  Yes, even oily skin needs to be hydrated.  However, the different skin types have different needs.

Normal Skin

Again, do whatever you want.  Your skin can handle anything.

Oily Skin

It is a common misconception that those with oily skin should use an oil-free moisturizer.  If you have oily skin, then you should use a light moisturizer made with oils high in linoleic acid.  The Kaiya Naturals Seedalina Moisturizer is designed for exactly this.

Combination Skin

Use a light moisturizer with oils high in linoleic acid on your T-Zone, and a heavy moisturizer on your U-Zone.

Dry Skin

Use a heavy moisturizer to lock in moisture.  The Kaiya Naturals Chickie Gold Moisturizer was made for this.

Sensitive Skin

Use a moisturizer made with calming ingredients like aloe and chamomile.  The less ingredients the better.  The Kaiya Naturals White Petal Aloe Moisturizer was designed for just this.

Step 3: Apply Sunscreen

No matter your skin type you should apply sunscreen to preventatively protect your skin from the sun.   Even if your moisturizer contains sunscreen you should still use a separate product that is specifically designed for this.  You should use at least an SPF 30.

The Take Away

No matter what you use to keep your skin healthy and beautiful, everyone should have a basic skin care routine that includes cleansing, moisturizing, and sunscreen.  Just be sure to personalize your basic routine to your skin type.

If there is anything that you would like me to talk about feel free to reach out to me either here, via email: kedric@kaiya-naturals.com, on twitter @kaiyanaturals, or on Facebook @kaiyanaturals.  Also  please, please, please share or comment on this article.  Seriously, I’d love to hear your feedback in the comment section below.

Stay Natural,

Kedric

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.  For educational purposes only.

Alcohol Gives You Psoriasis

You may want to think twice before drinking that beer.  As if alcohol didn’t have a bad enough reputation, you can now add psoriasis to the list of unwanted side-effects.  Not only can alcohol misuse cause this condition, alcohol abuse makes psoriasis more resistant to treatment.[1]  It is also an early warning of alcohol-related complications in the future, like liver disease.[2]

Women vs. Men

Alcohol seems to affect women and men differently.  For women, non-light beer (meaning regular ol’ beer) is associated with a higher risk.  Consumption of more than 2.3 non-light beers per week was a significant risk factor for new onset of psoriasis.  However, light beer, wine, and liquor had no effect.  This is thought to be 169937693because of a latent gluten-sensitivity resulting from non-distilled barley present in beer. Light beer also contains gluten, however, it contains significantly less. This may be a factor in why light beer did not show an association with psoriasis.[3]

For men,  those who consumed 100g of alcohol per day were 2.2 times more likely to have psoriasis than non-drinkers.[4] However, unlike women, where there is a causality between alcohol and new onset of psoriasis, there is only an association between the two in men at the moment.  But, don’t feel down about this girls.  Alcohol has a adverse effect on psoriasis treatment in men, but not women.[5]

So far, this seems to mean that:

  • For women, moderate consumption of regular beer causes psoriasis, but it won’t prevent treatments from working.
  • For men, alcohol abuse of any kind worsens psoriasis, and prevents treatments from working.

Early Warning System

Alcohol-related psoriasis is bad, but there is good news…sort of.  The good news is that it is an early indication of even worse alcohol-related diseases in the future.  No, it’s not good that you’re going to have an even worse condition in the future.  What is good is that you now know it, and have a chance to turn things around before it’s too late.

This is because alcoholics with psoriasis have a greater risk of liver disease, as well as a greater risk of overall death from alcohol-related causes.[6]  Psoriasis isn’t the only thing you should look out for, either.  Alcohol-related eczema, rosacea, post-adolescent acne, and infections are also signs that you are at a higher risk of alcohol-related complications.[7][8]

The Take Away

Women, if you are experiencing psoriasis as a result of alcohol consumption, stop drinking beer.  If you can’t do that, the good news is that you can treat it.  However, this is an early warning that you are headed down a dangerous path that may be leading to worse complications in the future.  Men, if you are experiencing the same thing, then there is only one thing that you can do – stop abusing alcohol.

If there is anything that you would like me to talk about feel free to reach out to me either here, via email: kedric@kaiya-naturals.com, on twitter @kaiyanaturals, or on Facebook @kaiyanaturals.  Also  please, please, please share or comment on this article.  Seriously, I’d love to hear your feedback in the comment section below.

Stay Natural,

Kedric

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.  For educational purposes only.


References:

[1] http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/742538_4

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10863217

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3017376/

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1662565/pdf/bmj00171-0026.pdf

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8496416

[6] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22004481

[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21611681

[8] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1292432

Which Oils Reduce Acne?

Oil-free moisturizers have become increasingly popular to use with acne.  However, by using them, you may be covering up the symptoms, instead of treating the cause.  This is because, if you are suffering from acne,  you have been shown to have inadequate levels of certain essential-fatty-acids (EFAs) in your sebum.  Sebum is the oil that your sweat glands secrete that is clogging your pores.  Using the right oil can replace those missing EFAs, resulting in less acne.

What are Essential-Fatty-Acids (EFAs)?

Fatty-acids are the building blocks of fats, and oils, in our body.  We can synthesize most fatty-acids from other components.  However, there are two that the body cannot produce on its own, which is why we call them “essential” fatty-acids.  We must get them through our diet.  Those two EFAs are linolenic acid, and linoleic acid.[1] The latter, linoleic acid, is the EFA that acne sufferers are deficient in.[2]

Linoleic vs. Oleic

oleic-linoleic-acid-selected-oilsSebum made with low levels of linoleic acid is more prone to clogging pores.[3]  This is thought to be caused by a higher concentration of oleic acid.[4]  The good news is that you don’t have to have to eat foods rich in linoleic acid to receive its benefits.  Topical application has been shown to decrease the size of acne lesions.[5]

The Bad Oils

Oils rich in oleic acid that you want to avoid are:

  • Almond Oil
  • Apricot Oil
  • Avocado Oil
  • Hazelnut Oil
  • Macadamia Oil
  • Olive Oil
  • Palm Fruit Oil
  • Shea Nut Oil
The Good Oils

Oils rich in linoleic acid that you should use instead are:

  • Black Cumin Seed Oil
  • Grape Seed Oil
  • Hempseed Oil
  • Poppyseed Oil
  • Rosehip Seed Oil
  • Safflower Oil
  • Sunflower Oil
  • Wheat Germ Oil

The Take Away

It is better to hydrate the skin, and balance the EFA profile of sebum, by supplementing it topically with oils rich in linoleic acid, than it is to cause the overproduction of sebum by aggressively drying the skin, or to use oil-free moisturizers that do not balance the EFA profile.[6]

Kaiya Naturals formulated the Seedlina Moisturizer, and the Higher Power After Shower Oil, with oils rich in linoleic acid: grape seed oil, hemp seed oil, and black cumin seed oil.  Make the switch today, and feel the Kaiya Natural difference.

If there is anything that you would like me to talk about feel free to reach out to me either here, via email: kedric@kaiya-naturals.com, on twitter @kaiyanaturals, or on Facebook @kaiyanaturals.  Also  please, please, please share or comment on this article.  Seriously, I’d love to hear your feedback in the comment section below.

Stay Natural,

Kedric

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.  For educational purposes only.


References:

[1] http://www.nutritionmd.org/nutrition_tips/nutrition_tips_understand_foods/fattyacids.html

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2936775

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2950180

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6223652

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9692305

[6] http://www.cosderm.com/view-pdf.html?file=fileadmin/qhi_archive/ArticlePDF/CD/021040211